Monthly Featured Artists

Each month, we feature some of our artists up at the front of the gallery. Usually 3 to 4 artists are featured for the month as well as Artwalk. These artists bring in new work at this time.
 
 
 
 
  1. Managing Director
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Eileen Schneegas


  A vitreous enamellist (one who fuses ground glass to metal, using high heat), will sometimes refer to their art as the art of surprise. You are never quite sure of the result. Each piece is one of a kind as each piece is prepared and kiln fired individually. I can make earrings similar to one another, but never an exact duplicate. 
   My work includes wearable designs (brooches, earrings and pendants) and also decorative work for the home or office in framed wall pieces, small 3 dimensional objects and as part of functional items such as boxes. I will do commissioned pieces occasionally.
   My background is in art, theatre and interior design. Gypsies raised me (or so it seemed!) and then I married a Navy Submariner. I have moved house frequently, counting New Jersey, Florida, California (several times), Hawaii, Texas, Connecticut, Maryland, Washington and London, England as temporary homes. I have traveled the US extensively and Europe and Asia less extensively.
   I take my inspiration from all my travel as well as the natural world around me. My heart holds a special place for companion animals and a goal is to create at least one of each of the recognized terrier breeds.

Contact Information:
(360)649-6082

Al Anderson

  1. Managing Director
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   In Norway, bentwood boxes were traditionally used as lunch boxes by farmers and herders. My grandfather, Nicholas Anderson, who immigrated to this area in 1897, brought from Norway his knowledge in making tine (pronounced tee-na) and korge.        
As a boy, I was fortunate to have watched him work. He passed his skills on to my parents, Al and Nora, who continued crafting them until my Dad’s passing in 1990. I occasionally helped my father throughout his years of making tine’s but did not actually go into the business for myself until recently.
   Now I am carrying on this family folk art, and except for a slight change in the design of my grandfather’s whittled end pieces, to ease opening its lid, my boxes are just like the ones my grandfather made. The wood is of maple and alder and the lacing is raffia.
The tradition carries on.....

Contact Information:
253 857-2551

Custom orders available..